Tag: Loch Chon

July 20, 2017 Ross MacBeath No comments exist

An on the spot report by Mechelle Rafferty

This is another report from real park users, in this case Michelle and the crew who have taken the time to record their experiences with LLTNP Camping provision at Loch Chon.  I think it’s safe to say from Mechelles comments and by the looks on the kids faces that it was a very enjoyable three days for all,  tents, water, fire, woods and canoes in a wonderful loch side location, the perfect combination for a great weekend in the park.

Mechelle goes onto describe other site attributes at the start of the video, and visits pitch 21, the jewel in the crown, representing what park users expect from camping pitches in the park.and what the National Park Authority should be delivering as their world class visitor experience.

 

An original loch side pitch at Loch Chon, Pitch 21 is used for groups and you are allowed to pitch 2 tents on this site
Pitch 21, the best pitch on the site, original loch shore location and holds 2 tents

As Mechelle says, it’s the only pitch you are allowed 2 tents, although it would seem some just ignore that rule.   See T&Cs here

Wither a larger family group or just on your own the site has something suitable for all..  There is of course one caveat, you have to book the right pitch, where a considerable number of pitches are just not up to the required standard  yet, and some even unusable so to avoid disappointment read on.

Again I thank Mechelle for her great report and I have extracted some still images from the video to make the details of each pitch easier to evaluate.  I have avoided adding too many additional comments and have tried to transcribe only those made by Mechelle in the video.  So it remains a true on the spot report..

 

“Taps still not working” “general area at car park  “Sparkling water supplied”

CLICK ANY IMAGE TO START SLIDE SHOW!

 

Pitch 1 – Video Counter  13:16

“Pitch 1 is a swamp”   “would not want to pitch on that”

 

 

Pitches 2 and 3 not reviewed

 

Pitch 4 – Video Counter 12:58

“They look campable”

“Looks all right”

 

Pitch 5 – Video Counter 12.33

Same as 4,

 

Pitches 6 and 7 not reviewed

 

Pitch 8 – Video Counter 11.55

Of disabled pitches 8 and 9 in general: !maybe they are out the question, ….they are level, ……but I personally wouldn’t personally want to camp on it”

“Pitch number 8 is flat, nice but right on the walkway, swampy(surrounding)” “Plastic surface”

 

 

Pitch 9  – Video Counter10:30

“I assume grass still has to grow” Hard plastic surface on disabled pitch 9

!they are level, but I personally wouldn’t personally want to camp on it”

 

Entrance to disabled pitch 9  “But look, would you really want to camp on that”

 

Pitch 10 – Video Counter 11.02

“Swampy, if you’re looking at the map, better to come and see pitches first”

“Never ever book pitch 10, unless you want to be waterlogged, …..swampy”

Water course running down beside pitch 8 feeding into pitch 10

 

Pitch 11  see Video Counter 14:27  –  “Alright but really, really bumpy”

“Party Tent, They had stopped by 5 in the morning, ……shouting between tents and flashing torches, still going on at 2 am, …..noise last night from that particular tent was quite bad”

No Image

 

 

Pitch 12 see Video Counter 14:28

” Don’t know how you could actually pitch on it”,

“unless you had a tiny 1 or 2 man tent”, ” it’s not even, even to walk on, really bumpy”

 

 

 

 

Pitch 13 Video Counter 15:10

“Bumpy”, “like they’ve just took a strimmer and cut it back”

 

Pitch 14  Video Counter  16:06

“It’s alright, it would fit our tent at least, quite flat”

 

Pitch 15  Video Counter 16:20

” Tiny, not very grassy and a bit dark, they’re not bad!”

 

Pitch 16  –  Video Counter  18:18

“Pitch 16 That’s alright….  not bad ….  a bit muddy”

 

 

 

Pitch 17  Video Counter  18:50

“That’s just a mess,”  That’s depressing”

[Ross]Official Pitch 17 at end of path is unsuitable, continuously wet and bramble filled.
[Ross] As Mechelle points out Possibly a new but smaller area being cleared further down the slope

Pitch 18 Video Counter 19:25

“Nice, not too muddy”, “18’s alright, 18’s fine”

 

Pitch 19 Video Counter 21:07

there’s no’ a bit of grass, there’s holes, you could maybe get a tent on there, but for a big tent your snookered”.

 

Pitch 20  Video Counter 20:28

“All tree roots, it’s not even flat, it’s on a slope, quite a bad one, a wee tiny tent, you could maybe get away with”.

 

Pitch 21  Video Counter  22:06

This is a nice big pitch, It’s perfect with a your ain wee bit to the loch

New logs cut from tree behind?

 

[Ross]Pitch 21 up there with the best camping in the park, and typical of so many loch shore sites that have been removed from access, with possibly another 6 pitches of different sizes of this standard going unused at this site alone……. See Video for all comments and other views of this pitch.

Pitch 22 Video Counter 21:30

“That’s Fine! and recommended

Pitch 23 also fine and recommended not shown

 

Pitch 24 Fine and recommended —

 

Pitch 25  Video Counter  17:14

 

Nice and close to the loch with path directly from pitch.

 

[Ross]Standing water to the LH edge of the pitch limits it’s size,

 

Pitch 26  Video Counter 16:54

“Looks alright, nice and level at least”

Muddy entrance to Pitch 26

 

All photo & video  credits to Mechelle Rafferty

So Check out the full video for a walk through and some other observations.

May 26, 2017 Ross MacBeath 3 comments

By Ross MacBeath

Loch Chon infrastructure

Driving along the B829 where trees are coming into full boom after the recent rain, the greater area of natural woodlands has greened up with mosses and other vegetation moving into their main growing season. Nowhere is this more obvious that at the Loch Chon site where easy access to the ancient woodland has been opened up with the campsite paths.  Here nature is fighting back after the trauma of machinery driving  unchecked over the hillside (see here) but even she can’t erase the scar of sterile (perhaps treated) forest bark at the approach to almost every camping pitch in the site.  An act of wanton environmental damage inflicted for no good reason in this sensitive eco-system.

 

 

On arriving at the gate, happy to see it open after previous experiences, we were met with an unfinished road surface.  At least I hope it’s unfinished with it’s uneven potholed surface, strewn with loose hardcore.

 

Expectations dashed by first impressions

 

The good news is the bin store is complete, the bad news is its a 2.7 metre high structure which dominates the vista.  It doesn’t even have a maze to hide the 6 or so bins now in place, remaining in full view from the car park opposite.   This is bin overkill, even if the Park’s projected 90% occupancy of the campsite should ever prove to be true, its too high, and an unnecessary intrusion in this natural setting.

 

Ranger Base and non compliant bin store
This image was taken 10th April 2017, Note:green bins now in store, 13/05/2017

It would  have made so much more sense to position the bins beside the toilets (rather than the office), where they would be more convenient for campsite users, but campers have never been a priority in this development.

 

Perhaps it’s more important for the refuse collectors to save the additional few hundred metres drive than to hide this monstrosity out of the way.  It’s a disastrous first impression of the site and is not what was discussed at preliminary meetings with the local community.

 

The bin store is not on the plans – a Breach of Planning Consent?

Following the granting of planning permission,  National Park planning staff granted a Non Material Variation to the plans.  Neither the original plans or the letter mention a bin store or any other structure at this location – the document NMV decision letter final refers.


The ‘S’ on the plan indicates the location of the Ranger Base/Store container.

 

 

Well there you have it.   The National Park Authority have breached their own planning consent while as the Planning Authority, they have so far failed to any take enforcement action.  In fact I have found out that the Planning Authority have not even made a compliance check on this planning application.  A surprising oversight for a £350k plus project which is a sensitive development in ancient woodland.

It seems the Park Authority also grant themselves special dispensation when it comes to planning compliance.

 

Containers!   Plunging our National Parks into mediocrity

 

Next door to the bins, the Ranger Base as it is affectionately known, is just a container or, more correctly 1/2 a container, the other 1/2 being a store for fire pits, wood and other sundries.  Currently it also serves as the main drinking water supply cupboard, more of which shortly.

 

Nevertheless the Ranger Base is a home from home and surely much appreciated by the overworked rangers traveling in from afar.  What with all their new enforcement duties it must give them time to reflect on what being a Ranger is really about.  It’s reminiscent of a sales office at a housing development, probably because that’s what it was.  The Park really should give priority  to toning down the white wall and the clinical door – its as if the National Park Board, whose members apparently visited the site, have decided that rural charm has no longer any place in our National Parks.

 

The container shows it’s true nature and it’s not natural – Fail

 

The last memory of your camping experience as you leave this site is this view of the office (below),  a shipping container more at home in Tilbury docks, than a sympathetic camping development.  It’s another one in the eye for the National Park’s Marketing Department.

 

 

It’s another breach in planning consent – Fail

This end elevation in the photo above is very different to the elevation shown in the engineering drawings for this container contained in the plans.  It did seem odd at the time the planning department allowed a drawing to be approved on their system that showed only one end elevation, not both, a very unusual situation.  What was not shown  is what we see here, a considerably larger and obtrusive industrialised door. The more cynical among us could be forgiven for believing this omission from the plans was not accidental.

 

Other apparent breaches of the planning consent in respect of the containers include: the construction method of the cladding, which is not mounted as shown in the plans; the omission of the concrete embedded posts from all containers on the site; and the hardcore which has not been graded to form a rise in ground to door level.

 

Site uncompleted – Fail

 

What is wrong with the Park Authority?    It would seem they lack the commitment to finish anything to do with this project and it is the local community and park users that have to put up with the mediocre result.

 

Why are the logs in the image above still lying on site, they interfere with the vegetation regrowth and will result in another bare patch when removed?  If they must be stored, do it on hard standing, better still in the Forestry Commission car park along the road.

 

Many of the pitches remain unusable, or just too small with slope remaining a problem as does wet or rough ground.

 

Talking of bare patches it would seem that reseeding work with the specified seed mix has not taken place, this should have been completed before the start of the growing season and should be carried out immediately to provide effective restoration in this season.

 

The use of containers sets a low tone for the whole development  – Fail

 

The design of this development is just not in keeping with the ethos of National Parks.  The LLTNPA really should take a leaf out of the Forestry Commission’s book when it comes to designing quality facilities.

 

Toilets

 

Compare the toilet block in Forest Drive which, when you see it, looks right to the abysmal containers at Loch Chon which have poor visual appeal and lower the tone of an otherwise beautiful woodland setting. It’s depressing to see Scottish Tourism dragged down on the world stage.

 

Forestry Commission – Shelter & Charm LLTNPA  – Containers, no shelter no charm

The Forestry Commission’s rustic solution to toilet blocks, shown on the left hand image was the preferred style choice at Strathard community meetings and what most people would wish to see in our National Park, in stark contrast to the “industrial” containers the Park Authority favours. It’s time the Park Authority started listening to its Partners instead of running roughshod over them.

 

The Park Authority’s  choice shows a lack of commitment to the success of this project.  The temporary nature of the installation means it can be moved to another site if required, or taken away in the winter,  a fact alluded to at the community consultations by Gordon Watson their Chief Executive.   This has been given precedence over all other design requirements with dire consequences.

 

The toilet blocks are containers like the ranger station, with high security metal doors to each “cell” opening in direct view of the car park opposite, offering no privacy to users. This is surely a breach of regulations.

 

No shelter for toilets queues in wet and windy weather  – Fail

 

Then the Park Authority’s failure to provide anything in the way of shelter is a serious design fault.  No consideration has been given to the needs of visitors who find themselves caught in the rain when all toilets are occupied, with nowhere to take cover.  Getting soaked  to the skin is difficult to recover from when camping and should be avoided.  At very least a canopy should have been provided across a widened gap between the two containers but of course what was really required was some forethought and a custom designed visitor toilet block with some visitor friendly features instead of this minimalist offering.

 

One camper remarked in its defence, “it’s not too bad” and that sums up the aspirations of the current National Park Board for new developments, “Not too Bad”.  Sadly at this site,  they’re often failing to achieve even that.

 

Dark Skies a Project to which the Park Authority just pays lip service – Fail

 

The inappropriate plastic bulkhead light fittings have been chosen with no consideration of the specification laid out in International Dark-Sky Association guidelines that the National Park claim to be promoting (see here).   The Park Authority are failing to make capital of this ideal site located away from any light pollution except for that of their own making.

 

Since the toilet block image (above) was taken, the fittings have been recessed into the wood cladding but still fail to comply with the dark skies requirement.  Light fittings should shade upward light emissions while other light output should be directed downwards by internal reflectors not flooding the hill side opposite and sky as is the case here.

 

Water Supply

The National Parks Chief Chief Executive Gordon Watson continues to preside over the issuing of false information in connection with the availability of drinking water at Loch Chon and the completion status of the site.

This statement is currently posted on the LLTNP blog By on
(see here under the section “Teething Issues”)

 

“Teething issues

Of course, with any new system or facility there will always be snagging issues. At our new Loch Chon campsite, the running water was unavailable for a few days after opening due to a temporary problem with the new connection. We immediately put in place contingency plans for anyone still wishing to camp so that they still had water and toilets at all times. The connection problem was fixed and the hot and cold water is up and running”

 

Then he assures us further down the post

 

“The most important thing is that we are responding quickly to any issues that arise and despite these snags”

 

Clearly the National Park Authority are failing to correct issues in good time.

 

 

Bottled water for drinking and dish washing? – Water supply faulty – Fail.

The National Park Authority first of all claimed the water supply had been working with just a short period out of action, but evidence collected on our many visits show that to be untrue.

The Park have now changed their story to say the contractor provided an external water supply during the period since opening.   On the  6 occasions I have personally visited since the site opened,  on 4 visits there was no drinking water and on 3 no water in the toilets. On another two occasions where a a local resident attended, there was no drinking water.  In total this represents 2 months without a contractor supply and 6 weeks without drinking water.

 

Incredibly on my 6th visit water was being supplied in plastic bottles – which raises the question once more, why?  (see here for recent history of the water issue)

 

In any case to recap on the real problem,  With a reported £100,000 spend, even before planning consent, the hydrology of the stream they chose to use as the water supply should have been monitored over the previous year’s cycle to identify any periods where the stream levels were low or dried up before selecting it as a source. The question needs to asked why would the planning department grant permission for a campsite without a guaranteed water supply?  It’s beyond comprehension.  In fact when you look at the plans, there is no detail of the water intake design or specification for the size of the header tank, reservoir or pool that would be a requirement  for a successful water supply. The upshot has been there is only a trickle of water in the stream in dry spells which goes a long way to explaining the intermittent nature of water supply.

 

 

After each visit I have made, I have pointed out the short comings to the Park who have then modified the installation to mitigate each issue but as of yet have failed to take on board what is required to be done.  After the dry spell at the beginning of May 2017, the water level dropped so low air could be drawn into the intake pipe.  The Park has responded by creating a slightly more substantial dam using sandbags instead of the the pebbles and rocks of the last one.  This is getting them through by the skin of their teeth, providing  unfiltered water for the toilets and wash hand basins but has not provided the solution to the drinking water problem.

I think SEPA should have something to say about interfering with culverts in this way.

 

Intake pipe without strainer – Fail

 

The intake pipe remains open to the flow of water which poses serious risks for debris to enter the system with potential for blockages (see Solution here).

 

The sandbag issue aside, the problem with the water supply is even more serious, it’s a design fault which the Park Authority have been aware of from before the 1st March 2017 but for reasons known only to them have failed to correct. The problem is simple, the intake pipe being below the bridge is effectively underground and the level between the intake and outlet at the taps is too small for water to flow as this diagram explains.

 

Diagram showing principle of water head expaiming pressure loss in system

 

The solution is equally simple,  assuming everything else is equal and no damage has been done to the plant through running it without a water feed.  Raise the intake pipe level by moving it higher.  There is a natural reservoir just upstream at the base of a waterfall, in the form of a pool which provides a natural header tank, something that’s required for all such installations to ensure as continuous supply.  They could of courses go one better and take the feed from above the waterfall giving even more gain in elevation and therefore water pressure.   Campers will just have to wait with baited breath and struggle without effective dish washing using instead 330 ml bottles of water to somehow fill the massive trough of a sink. With no reliable water supply for over three months, questions need to be asked what are the Park Board going to do about it and why have the planning department not enforced this requirement?  What other campsites are allowed to operate without running water?

 

Drawings missing from the Planning Portal

 

Inexplicably a header tank was never a feature of the Park Authorities design.  In fact there is no design for any water supply intake.  There was a reference to the intake location on a previously available drawing which has been removed from the remaining document set (18 documents) on their planning portal, another instance of lack of transparency in this project and indeed with many other Park projects.

 

A new screening fence has been fitted behind the toilets – success!

The protruding tops of sewerage works and other toilet related plumbing is now screened from view hiding the surface installation of inspections chambers which should have been hidden below ground in the first place.

 

Disabled pitches the ongoing saga

 

Disabled Pitch Update – dirt pitch surfaces are not acceptable – Continued Fail

 

Disabled pitches are part of another key Park Authority project promoting access for disabled users to National Park facilities.  Our original post (see here) highlighted the disgraceful  pitches that were provided for disabled access.  This obviously caused alarm bells to ring and improvements were made almost immediately, but how the originals were ever deemed suitable by Park Board members when they visited the site, says something about the Board’s attention to detail or, some might say, total disinterest in the provision of adequate disabled facilities.

 

Dirt surface of disabled pitch 8 very unplesant in the rain
Disabled Pitch 8 13/05/2017, barely able to contain a 3 man tent with unconstrained edges posing hazards

 

The original state of pitch 8, promoted for disabled use together with pitch 9 due to their accessibility  for toilets and car park was disgraceful. (See Video Here)   They were built in a water course cut out from a bramble patch on a wet and muddy area prone to flooding. This modified pitch has been created over the top of that area by building it up on a hardcore plinth with soil covering a hexagonal geo-membrane and provides a marked improvement on the old effort in many ways but fails in an important number of others.

Fail 1:In building up this pitch the edges of the soil  should have been constrained to stop any further spread out over the surrounding vegetation.  Soil spread is already evident through exposure of the plastic mesh which is creating a trip hazard.  Further, the edge of the pitch drops off rapidly close to the tent entrance and again poses a real risk of tripping or falling down the slope.

 

Fail 2 – as with so many other pitches  in this development, this pitch is just too small, for disabled users, some of whom may need a larger tent for access or to take a wheelchair or other aids inside. Here we see a 3 man tent pushed to the back and side edges of the pitch so it will fit and still leave room to get in and out. With table and chairs filling the remainder of the pitch, the fire pan and additional seating have had to go on the path on the other side of the tent.  This is effectively the largest tent this pitch will take and even then it is cramped.  This makes the pitch useless for a larger tent suitable for families.

 

Fail 3 – This tent has been erected without the use of guy lines which has only been possible because its a self supporting tent.  Of course not using guy lines is unusual as they are important for the stability of the tent structure and a necessity in the wind where damage to the tent and poles can occur if not tensioned properly with the possibility of the tent being blown away.   Fitting guy lines at this pitch is problematic due to the hard core path to the side and front of the tent and the area to the back of the tent is the diverted water course making pegging out difficult if not impossible at times.
The other issue of course is that guy lines impede the movement of people around the pitch particularly in  the case of a disabled user with a wheel chair.or requiring assistance to get in and out of the tent  So the small size of this pitch is of serious concern and brings into questions it’s suitability as a easy access pitch pitch.for disabled users.

 

Fail 4: It is now well over a month since this “improved pitch surface” was provided to pitches 8 and 9 and they have not been seeded with the recommended seed mix stated in the planning application, This pitch should have a grass surface not dirt.  The occupants of the tent in the above image explained heavy rain over night and early morning  wet the dirt surface resulting in it being carried into the tent on muddy foot wear.

 

Pitch 9 as the second pitch assigned for disabled and easy access and is only a little better.

 

Pitch 9l It'sdirty hard surface remains unseeded and unsuitable for use

 

Other than the fact it’s is easier to peg out guy lines as it sits back from the path.  The dirt surface remains a problem carrying a muddy mess into the sleeping area in wet weather but has also compressed below the level of the Geo-membrane leaving an unsuitably hard surface for pitching a tent.

 

Perforation of the tent base is likely while the resultant surface is also very uncomfortable making it both painful to kneel on this surface and creating a risk of physical injury.

 

As before the pitch is too small for anything more than a three man tent.mitigated some what by the fact there is other ground around for occupants..

 

This path also fails to comply with the planning consent, the aggregate should not be spread over vegetation and it should be be bounded by a seeded, graded soil bank to allow it to blend in with the land scape.

 

What needs to be done.

  • As a matter of urgency the planning enforcement team need to visit this site and make the applicant comply with the planning consent.
  • Complete snagging – the snagging list is sizable.
  • Correct water supply as a matter of urgency. The Park Authority need look no further than this simple solution at the Cononish Goldmine supply.  A solution they and the planning authority should be aware of as they sanctioned it.SImple but effective header tank - Cononish Goldmine Simple Strainer Solution - Cononish Goldmine supplyNote also the strainer on the end of the pipe another fiendishly simple solution, a copper stopper pipe with some nail holes.  A strainer requires to be fitted at Loch Chon site to avoid future supply failures.
  • Urgently correct surface issues on disabled pitches and seed with grass
  • Pitch size needs to be increased at many pitches and some surfaces constrained – disabled pitches 8 and 9 are a priority.
  • Where pitch size cannot be increased due to poor site selection, an auxiliary area beside the pitch should be created so campsite users can sit and cook by their tents.
    This would probably require a new planning application and not be a Non Material Variation
  • Remove unsuitable pitches from the booking system
  • Change booking system and include pitch descriptions and photographs, especially in connection with the size of tent and the number occupants the pitch can accommodate.
  • Complete seeding process so recovery of damaged areas can be achieved this season
  • Rethink the use of sand as a pitch surface, it’s ridiculous and gets carried into the tent.
  • Paths constructed on spongy ground.needs to be dug out and consolidated as per the statement in the planning consent.- 3 locations identified so far.
  • Paths need to be brought  up to the specification of the planning consent with respect to edge grading and restoration of edges through seeding.
April 16, 2017 Ross MacBeath No comments exist
Extract from secret Board Meeting about implementation camping byelaws. The claimed antisocial behaviour has been grossly overstated as has its popularity as a camping destination – too inaccessible for most.

By Ross MacBeath

What differentiates a campsite from wild camping?   Most people would say at the very least the existence of  services such as the provision of drinking water and toilets.  The evidence from my visits to  Loch Chon the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park Authority cannot even provide a reliable water supply for the £7 a night charge  (see here for post and here for a set of photographs of wider issues with the campsite).

 

The reasons why the water supply at Loch Chon is defective

 

One of the first principle of designing a private water supply it to ensure the availability of water from the source stream by carrying out a year long study of peak water flow. What follows below shows that  these investigations were either not carried out or ignored but its worth considering first why the LLTNPA has behaved in this manner..

 

Gordon Watson at a Public Meeting with Strathard Community Council on the 4th July 2016 stated that the Loch Chon campsite was chosen for it’s suitability and merits as a campsite rather than its availability.  The slide above, which was obtained subsequently through FOI, shows that this is not true and that Loch Chon was the ONLY option  that would allow the LLTNPA to deliver the  number of pitches they had promised to Scottish Ministers by 1st March to enact their byelaws.

 

What this shows is that the LLTNPA intended to build a campsite at Loch Chon no matter what.  For how the LLTNPA dealt with its planning permission to itself (see here). This is reprehensible behavior on all counts and LLTNPA are quite clearly paying the price with a defective water supply. But ultimately it’s visitors and communities who will pay the real price for this unwarranted development going forward.

 

Peak water flow and the LLTNPA Loch Chon water supply

 

An unsightly installation with loops in blue water pipe makes a poor impression.  When taken together with the positioning of the intake manifold, which is partially out of the water, unsecured and likely to be dislodged the first time the stream is in spate, it provides a rather damming but realistic indication of what was initially installed.

 

Just while we’re looking at this image, you can see that the concrete floor of the culvert under the bridge is smooth and curved.  This is done intentionally to stop materials collecting on the surface.  When the stream is in spate, large boulders are transported in the torrent of water and the smooth culvert base ensures they can roll right through preventing them from  causing an obstruction under the bridge. We will see why this is important later in the article.

 

Another important factor in providing a water supply is water pressure

 

One measure of the effectiveness of the water supply is determined by the water flow from the taps, which is of course dependent on the water pressure.  Water pressure in turn determined by the difference in elevation between the tap and the intake manifold.  The greater the height between the two the greater the pressure.

 

At this development the Park Authority have chosen to place the intake manifold almost 2  metres underground just by the road bridge over the stream  though it is still above the level of the taps which are further down the slope.  Not sufficiently high though to provide a sufficient head of water which is responsible for many of the issues with the water supply.   It would seem clear then that the intake manifold is in the wrong pace. It’s a basic design flaw and still goes uncorrected even though the LLTNPA is aware of the fact.

An essential requirement is that the intake manifold is always underwater

 

You would think that making sure the intake manifold is always under water would be a given. Yet here we are at Loch Chon on the 12th  March 2017 with the manifold almost completely uncovered  drawing air into the system.

 

Water intake pipe is aove the water level of the river drawing air instead of water.
Image 12th March 2017 lying on surface at water level

 

The problem is clear that the stream does not have sufficient water flow in dry periods.  This was evident during a dry spell starting before March 1st and through 12th March when the water supply failed intermittently when the intake pipe was not fully submerged causing air to be drawn into the system. In this location there is sufficient depth of water the intake is just not positioned properly.

 

 

Of course once the air lock is in the system it won’t self clear easily as water won’t flow up hill.  So many basic principles have just been overlooked cumulatively resulting in poor system design. This is a contributory factor together with the failure of staff, the clerk of works and the contractor to understand the basic requirements for implementing such a water supply.

 

One must ask who is managing this project, clearly the people involved with the development at Loch Chon have little or no understanding of stream feeds to private water supplies or their design. This lack of capability is worrying in an organisation which claims to wish to provide more campsites.   The LLTNPA is evidently not up to the task.

 

One week later the water was partially on, there was drinking water but no toilets

 

One week later on the 19th March 2017 the intake pipe was submerged once more, after some rainfall, however the water to the toilets and wash hand basins was still off.  You can see here the pipe had been removed from the clips removing the ridiculous upward loops in the water feed pipe.

 

Recent rainfall has caused the stream level to rise and cover manifold The Intake Manifold under the surface of the stream after rainfall

The water supply was still causing issues, drinking water was  available but toilet flushing was not.

Two weeks later there is still no effective water supply

 

On the 2nd of April the water supply was again only partially functioning the intake manifold was submerged  and there was water.   This time while one toilet was working the drinking water wasn’t.  3 of the 4 toilets remained locked.  The disabled toilet wass open and functioning with wash hand basins.

 

Another week on engineers were working on the system and some water was flowing

 

10th April 2017 – Water was now available from the outside taps though pressure was so low the auto shut off taps fail to operate correctly.  Well at least there was drinking water on site.  Although container filling took a while, it was better than nothing.

 

Again only one toilet was unlocked but I am pleased to report  it was flushing and the wash hand basin was operational. The other three toilets remain locked and strangely it was not the disabled toilet that was open.

 

It had taken the LLTNPA well over a month since the date the campsite was officially open to get even a basic water supply in place.  This was my first visit where toilets and drinking water have been available together but it is clear the LLTNPA are not out of the woods yet with low flow rates and intermittent supply. The test will be when all 4 toilets are in operation and water still comes out of the taps.

 

The engineers were working on the system when I arrived and allowed an opportunity to see whats inside the container next to the toilet block. It does look like there is a leak in the container roof.

 

The confusion over the hot and cold taps had also been sorted and there were now neutered tap tops both supplying cold water.

 

The  LLTNPA have been busy correcting some of the issues above and creating others

 

My visit on the 10th of April 2017 showed some changes.  The main visible differences one week on were  up by the intake manifold.  They had cut the pipe back and fitted a black sheath which is far less  intrusive.  The had also removed the old stainless steel manifold and fitted a cage to cover the end of the pipe.  However the pipe end is open and directly facing into the water flow with nothing to prevent  pebbles and smaller items being transported down the stream from finding their way into the system, so anything smaller than the mesh can also enter the intake pipe.  I think this may pose a problem for the future, potentially causing blockages in the intake pipe and significant costs and disruption to clear it. Some form of strainer or baffle is surely required.

 

Cage fitted over intake pipe, small stones of dam will be washed away with first rains In dryer weather the water level fails to cover the intake pipe

Click on images for zoomed view

 

The second and most important is the placement of the intake port on to the surface of the culvert, these images are very telling considering the recent weather has been wet followed by a short dry spell, the level here has dropped 20 cm since last checked.3 weeks ago.

 

This indicates the Peak flow of the stream may be very small in dry weather.

The problem is clear, the peak flow of the stream on dry days is so small that the water level in the culvert is no more than a centimetre or so and doesn’t even cover the intake pipe.  To solve this a small dam, and I mean small, has been created with stones and gravel where the depth of water behind this is sufficient to cover the intake pipe.

 

Culverts are designed to prevent debris collecting

As we discussed already, the smooth curved floor of the culvert is designed to prevent debris collecting in this location.  The Debris (dam) (photo above) will be removed by fast water flow.

Even with the current level of water flow the smaller stones and gravel around the intake pipe will be washed away eventually breaking the dam causing the water level to drop below the intake pipe and the water supply to fail.

 

In Spate the stream will remove all debris

With any heavy rain storm the stream will be in spate, the force of water will clear all of the rocks forming the dam in the culvert.  When in spate the stream can also carry branches and fallen trees down through the culvert but now with the fixed obstruction of the mesh cage there is a possibility that these will damage the cage or more likely get jammed on it causing a build up of debris in the culvert. This is not good practice and I would think it should be avoided.

 

The arrangement of the pipe has changed, now entering the river bank at a much lower level, the pipe is not secured on it’s traverse across the culvert and the gap underneath will most likely collect sticks and other vegetation then a build up of debris will possibly  occur.

 

Two months on and no further forward.

 

Around 2 months since the water problems became public and it would seem we are right back where we started with an intermittent supply determined by rainfall.   The National Park Authority really have to get their act together on this and stop penny pinching.  There is a problem with the water supply and it’s clear what it is.  In dry spells there is no water.  Get it sorted!  The solution is simple providing the stream does not dry up altogether, and only time will tell if that’s going to happen.

 

One thing remains clear, the LLTNPAs current solution is unlikely to work effectively even in the short term.

The real problem here is systemic failures within the LLTNPA

 

The LLTNPA Board should have been well aware of these problems as some apparently visited the campsite but have denied their existence in almost every public forum, even at their own board meetings.  I’m aware of one occasion where their spokesperson stated “As with any new site, there have been some snagging issues such as the running water which was unavailable for a few days due to a temporary problem with the new connection”  at least finally giving a nod to a problem everyone knows exists.     41 days of no water, limited water or intermittent water supply is hardly reflected by their “temporary problem”.   I believe it’s clear from the series of images here that the  problem has existed from the beginning and the vagaries of Scottish weather has determined if water was available or not. The solutions created  just promise more of the same – an ineffectual, intermittent water supply.

 

See here for video on the 19th March and here for the 2nd April

 

In the strange world of infallibility the LLTNPA inhabit even when they’rere wrong, they say they’re right and put out statement claiming all is well, whether it’s true or not.  This was certainly what happened at their board meeting on the 13th of March when numerous board members patted each other on the back for a job well done at Loch Chon and for getting the site finished on tiime.   This was witnessed by seven members of the public but should have been recorded for all to see.   Quite a surreal experience to see a National Park Authority  behave in this way.